This is my first tomato. It’s a little underripe (the first one always is) and it’s not very big, but it’s mine and I cared for it and grew it. #garden

This is my first tomato. It’s a little underripe (the first one always is) and it’s not very big, but it’s mine and I cared for it and grew it. #garden

garden

Old friends, good hugs, shiny new gym, good routes, losing track of time. Nothing is perfect, but sometimes coming back is a balm for the soul.

climbing me personal

ted:

This is what sound looks like

You’ve never seen sound visualizations like this before. Evan Grant creates beautiful illustrations of what we hear by capturing the vibrations from sound waves in mediums like sand or water. This process — called cymatics — makes sound look so wonderfully alien.  

Watch the full talk here »

(via scientific-women)

ejlandsman:

Here are some (true) facts about the axolotl:
- they exhibit neoteny, meaning they reach sexual maturity without going through metamorphosis - they are capable of regenerating lost limbs, and so are frequently subjects of scientific experiments  - they’re critically endangered and unbelievably adorable

ejlandsman:

Here are some (true) facts about the axolotl:

- they exhibit neoteny, meaning they reach sexual maturity without going through metamorphosis
- they are capable of regenerating lost limbs, and so are frequently subjects of scientific experiments
- they’re critically endangered and unbelievably adorable

(via scientificillustration)

women-in-science:

casualstroll:

E. coli, watercolor on cheap dollar store construction paper.

Attempted art currently hanging in my office.  People tend to have this misconception that all scientists do is science (yes, science is now a verb because English - linguistics minor ftw).  So, here’s a challenge for all of my scientist/scientist-in-training followers out there: post something you do that isn’t science! An interest, a hobby, etc. (If you aren’t technically in the STEM fields, feel free to do it anyways!)   

I climb rocks! Not as often as I’d like but with some regularity. I also draw and paint and I make beaded bracelets that people pay me for.

women-in-science:

casualstroll:

E. coli, watercolor on cheap dollar store construction paper.

Attempted art currently hanging in my office.  People tend to have this misconception that all scientists do is science (yes, science is now a verb because English - linguistics minor ftw).  So, here’s a challenge for all of my scientist/scientist-in-training followers out there: post something you do that isn’t science! An interest, a hobby, etc. (If you aren’t technically in the STEM fields, feel free to do it anyways!)   

I climb rocks! Not as often as I’d like but with some regularity. I also draw and paint and I make beaded bracelets that people pay me for.

science women in science hobbies work life balance

partysoft:

usagov:

Image description: On Saturday, the Navy christened a new research ship the “Sally Ride” after the first U.S. woman and youngest person in space. It is the fifth current ship named for an astronaut. 
Photo from the U.S. Navy

the person doing the christening is dr. tam o’shaughnessy, ride’s partner of 27 yrs. sally ride was not just the first woman and youngest person in space: she was also the first lesbian in space - likely, the first lgbtq person in space.

partysoft:

usagov:

Image description: On Saturday, the Navy christened a new research ship the “Sally Ride” after the first U.S. woman and youngest person in space. It is the fifth current ship named for an astronaut. 


Photo from the U.S. Navy

the person doing the christening is dr. tam o’shaughnessy, ride’s partner of 27 yrs. sally ride was not just the first woman and youngest person in space: she was also the first lesbian in space - likely, the first lgbtq person in space.

(via women-in-science)

thebrainscoop:

The Brain Scoop:
Fossil Sharks

If an animal has a skeleton of cartilage can it still be found in the fossil record? Spoiler alert; yes, but sometimes it doesn’t give us the entire picture. 

Myths and conjecture surround the hypothetical monster sharks of prehistory but with the help of dedicated researchers and well-appointed technologies we are able to place some of these bigger questions to bed (at least, for now) - and in the case of sharks, with teeth as our only clue. 

Here’s No. 2 in our series of five consecutive calendar days dedicated to predatory cartilaginous fishes! 

GUYS. More sharks! With added Helicoprion!

several consecutive calendar days devoted to predatory cartilaginous fish shark week sharks science the brain scoop videos

Okay, guys. Here’s the deal. Sharks play a really important role in our oceans’ ecosystems and without them we are basically screwed. We don’t have to be scared of them. We damn well shouldn’t eat them (in the same way we shouldn’t eat ANY THREATENED ANIMAL, GUYS. Did Margaret Atwood teach you nothing? Come on!). 

But everyone seems to think it’s fun to sensationalize sharks into these terrors of the seas (*cough*SharkWeek*cough*. I just don’t understand how learning about actual shark science is somehow less compelling than sharks eating people. They’re totally fascinating creatures who need our help. Did you know that their scales are made of the same stuff our teeth are made of, and that they’re kind of shaped like tiny teeth too? That’s awesome!

Science educators on YouTube have stepped it up in a big way this week, and you can watch an awesome playlist on real, true, fact-driven shark science here.

sharks shark week it's okay to be smart the brain scoop science shark science ichthyology ichthyology is really hard to spell video